Connect with us

Drone Lobbyist News

Drone Laws in Minnesota

Published

on

This post was originally published on this site

Paying attention to everything the FAA has put forth since their rules and regulations were initially put into full effect is crucial for all drone fliers. Although, do you know the laws and regulations related to drones in your state, as well?

Flying Over Minnesota

Unfortunately for us, Minnesota doesn’t have any clear areas where you get the green light to fly in. With this in mind, we strongly recommend that you visit the Minnesota Department of Transportation’s website before you take your drone out. They have quite a bit of information that you’ll no doubt find useful and necessary.

The Registering Process in Minnesota

The Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) requires that all Small Unmanned Aircraft Systems (UAS) owners follow strict regulations and laws. You will need to file your name, home address and your email address as a start.

From there, you will receive a Certificate of Aircraft Registration and Proof of Ownership. These will include an identification number for your aircraft. You must have this number displayed on your drone at all times. The number will be valid for up to 3 years.

All aircraft that weighs more than 0.55 pounds, or 250 grams, and less than 55 pounds, or 25 kilograms, must be registered. This also includes any added payloads, such as an onboard camera.

You must be at least 13-years-old in order to register and, effective December 21st, 2015, all newly purchased or made drones must be registered before their first flight. You are able to register through a paper-based process, but you can also do so online by clicking here.

Proximity to Airports in Minnesota

As a general rule of thumb, and in accordance with the law from the FAA, you may not fly within a 5-mile radius of any airport. In 2012 the FAA enacted the Modernization and Reauthorization Act which requires hobbyist drone operators, meaning residential, to contact air traffic control and/or airport management if they are operating within a 5-mile radius of any local airport.

This is enacted nationwide, not only in Minnesota, under Part 101 of the Act, being Special Rule for Model Aircraft, to ensure that drone operations under unsafe conditions are disapproved before the drone can be launched.

Regardless of the local airport you will be flying near, and possibly breaching airspace, you will need to contact either the airport air traffic control tower or the airport operator.

You will need to establish an agreed-upon operating procedure with airport air traffic or the airport operator and answer a couple of questions. For example, questions relating to how long you are going to be flying for.

Unique Drone Laws in Minnesota

At this time of writing, all of the legal information listed below is deemed as accurate as possible and fully in effect.

Superior National Forest and Boundary Water Canoe Area Wilderness – Executive Order 10092

Because of Minnesota’s Executive Order 10092, the use of drones within a range of 4,000 above the Boundary Water Canoe Area Wilderness is not permitted unless the Forest Service from Superior National Forest authorizes the flight.

However, this is usually only the case for search and rescues. Anyone wanting to fly for a commercial purpose must request and obtain a permit given by the Forest Service through their local Forest office.

Drone Ban in St. Bonifacius

The city of St. Bonifacius has placed a strict ban on drones where public city airspace is concerned. Drones are no longer allowed to fly anywhere within the city limits, both in air and on land.

Minnesota Department of Transportation – Registration Requirement

Any commercial drone users within the state of Minnesota looking to fly, for whatever reason, must register with the Minnesota Department of Transportation as confirmed below:

“All UAS registered with the FAA in this manner and owned by a Minnesota resident must register with MnDOT and pay an annual registration fee in Minnesota. Non-residents using UAS for commercial operations in Minnesota must also register their UAS before the aircraft is used for commercial purposes. To complete registration of the aircraft, the owner is required to show proof that sales tax has been paid and provide insurance information. The insurance must comply with the requirements of Minnesota Statute 360.59, Subd. 10. On the Minnesota registration form, use the same registration number that was provided by the FAA that starts with “N-“.”

HF3919 – Drone Regulations

Sec. 14. Minnesota Statutes 2017, section 360.013, is amended by adding a subdivision to read:

Subd. 62. Unmanned aircraft system. “Unmanned aircraft system” means an unmanned powered aircraft that does not carry a human operator can be autonomous or remotely piloted or operated and can be expendable or recoverable. Unmanned aircraft system does not include a satellite orbiting the earth.

Sec. 16. Minnesota Statues 2014, section 360.075, is amended by adding a subdivision to read:

Subd. 8. Unmanned aircraft system operations. Every person who:

Operates an unmanned aircraft system either on or over land or water in this state without the consent of the owner of such aircraft;

Knowingly operates an unmanned aircraft system with a certificate of registration issues by the commissioner of transportation that is canceled, revoked, suspended, or altered;

Operates any unmanned aircraft system in such a manner as to indicate either a willful or a wanton disregard for the safety of persons or property;

Carries on or over land or water in this state in an aircraft other than a public aircraft any explosive substance except as permitted by United States Code title 18. chapter 40 and Code of Federal Regulations, title 27, part 555;

Launches or recovers an unmanned aircraft system from state or private property without consent; or

Interferes with manned aircraft by willfully damaging, disrupting the operations of, or otherwise interfering with a manned aircraft while taking off, landing, in flight, or otherwise in motion through the use of an unmanned aircraft system except as may be permitted by other laws of this state is guilty of a misdemeanor.

EFFECTIVE DATE. This section is effective January 1. 2017 and applies to offenses committed on or after that date.

Sec. 17. Minnesota Statutes 2014, section 360.075, is amended by adding a subdivision to read:

Subd. 9. Gross misdemeanor. Every person who commits any of the acts specified in subdivision 8 for a second of subsequent time is guilty of a gross misdemeanor.

EFFECTIVE DATE. This section is effective January 1, 2017 and applies to offenses committed on or after that date.

Sec. 18. Minnesota Statutes 2014, section 360.075, is amended by adding a subdivision to read:

Subd. 10. Careless of reckless operation. Every person who operates an unmanned aircraft system in the air of on the ground or water in a careless or reckless manner so as to endanger the life or property of another is guilty of a misdemeanor.

EFFECTIVE DATE. This section is effective January 1, 2017 and applies to offenses committed on or after that date.

Sec. 19. Minnesota Statues 2014, section 360.55, is amended by adding a subdivision to read:

Subd. 9. Unmanned aircraft system. (a) An unmanned aircraft system operated for commercial purposes must be registered for an annual fee of $25 and provide proof of a sales tax payment. An unmanned aircraft system registered under this paragraph is not subject to the taxes and fees provided in sections 360.511 to 360.67
(b) An unmanned aircraft system operated for private, noncommercial purposes is not subject to registration and fee requirements under this subdivision or to taxes and fees under sections 360.511 to 360.67.
(c) An unmanned aircraft system owned and operated by a government entity must be registered for an annual fee of $25 and provide proof of a sales tax payment. An unmanned aircraft system registered under this paragraph is not subject to the taxes and fees provided in sections 360.511 to 360.67.

EFFECTIVE DATE. This section is effective January 1, 2017.

Sec. 20. [360.591] UNMANNED AIRCRAFT SYSTEM; COMMERCIAL USE PERMIT.

Subdivision 1. Permit required. A person is prohibited from operating an unmanned aircraft system for a commercial purpose in this state unless the person possesses a valid commercial operator permit issued by the Department of Transportation for the unmanned aircraft system being operated. An operator must apply for the permit from the department in the manner provided by the department.

Subd. 2. Permit requirements; eligibility. In order to be eligible for a commercial operator permit under this section a person must:
Be at least 17 years of age;
Possess a valid driver’s license;
Pass a knowledge test for operating an unmanned aircraft system;
Register and pay the fee under section 360.55 subdivision 9 paragraph (a); and
Satisfy all other applicable state or federal regulations

Subd. 4. Unlawful commercial operations. A person who operates an unmanned aircraft system for commercial purposes in violation of this section is guilty of a misdemeanor.

Subd. 5. Liability insurance required. In order to operate an unmanned aircraft system for commercial purposes in Minnesota, a person must carry liability insurance protecting third parties for both personal injury and property damage.

Other Legal Issues With Drones in Minnesota

At this time of writing, there are currently a number of bills in circulation within the state of Minnesota surrounding drones.

HR 1138 – Wildfire Airspace Protection Act of 2017

Be it enacted by the Senate and House of Representatives of the United States of America in Congress assembled,
SECTION 1. SHORT TITLE.
This Act may be cited as the “Wildfire Airspace Protection Act of 2017”.
SEC. 2. INTERFERENCE WITH WILDFIRE SUPPRESSION, LAW ENFORCEMENT, OR EMERGENCY RESPONSE EFFORT BY OPERATION OF UNMANNED AIRCRAFT.
(a) In General.—Chapter 65 of title 18, United States Code, is amended by adding at the end the following:
Ҥ 1370. Interference with wildfire suppression, law enforcement, or emergency response effort by operation of unmanned aircraft
“(a) Offense.—Except as provided in subsection (b), an individual who operates an unmanned aircraft and in so doing knowingly or recklessly interferes with a wildfire suppression, law enforcement, or emergency response effort shall be fined under this title or imprisoned not more than 5 years, or both.
“(b) Exceptions.—This section does not apply to the operation of an unmanned aircraft conducted by a unit or agency of the United States Government or of a State, tribal, or local government (including any individual conducting such operation pursuant to a contract or other agreement entered into with the unit or agency) for the purpose of protecting the public safety and welfare, including firefighting, law enforcement, or emergency response.
“(c) Definitions.—In this section, the following definitions apply:
“(1) WILDFIRE.—The term ‘wildfire’ has the meaning given that term in section 2 of the Emergency Wildfire Suppression Act (42 U.S.C. 1856m).
“(2) WILDFIRE SUPPRESSION.—The term ‘wildfire suppression’ means an effort to contain, extinguish, or suppress a wildfire.”.
(b) Clerical Amendment.—The table of sections for chapter 65 of title 18, United States Code, is amended by adding at the end the following new item:

“1370. Interference with wildfire suppression, law enforcement, or emergency response effort by operation of unmanned aircraft.”.

HF366 – Hunting & Fishing Restrictions

A bill for an act relating to games and fish; prohibiting use of unmanned aircraft systems to take, harm, or harass wild animals; proposing coding for new law in Minnesota Statutes; Chapter 97A

BE IT ENACTED BY THE LEGISLATURE OF THE STATE OF MINNESOTA

Section 1. [97A.036] USE OF UNMANNED AIRCRAFT SYSTEMS TO TAKE WILD ANIMALS PROJIBITED.

Subdivision 1. Definitions. (a) The definitions in this subdivision apply to this section.
(b) “Unmanned aircraft” means an aircraft that is operated without the possibility of direct human intervention from within or on the aircraft.
(c) “Unmanned aircraft system” means an unmanned aircraft and associated elements including communication links and the components that control the unmanned aircraft that are required for the pilot in command to operate safely and efficiently in the national airspace system.

Subd. 2. Prohibition. A person may not use an unmanned aircraft system to take, harm, or harass a wild animal.

HF858 – Commercial Registration

A bill for an act relating to aeronautics; providing for registration of unmanned aircraft; amending Minnesota Statutes

READ LATER - DOWNLOAD THIS POST AS PDF >> CLICK HERE <<

Drone Laws in Minnesota was originally posted at https://www.dronethusiast.com/drone-laws-minnesota/ by

Continue Reading
Advertisement

aerial cinematography

$1,000 is Up for Grabs Every Week – AirVuz Drone Video of the Week Contest!

Published

on

This post was originally published on this site

AirVuz is the top spot for drone videographers to show off their work.  Show off your best with a chance to win $1,000 every week in the AirVuz Video of the Week contest!

Miriam McNabb is the Editor-in-Chief of DRONELIFE and CEO of JobForDrones, a professional drone services marketplace, and a fascinated observer of the emerging drone industry and the regulatory environment for drones. Miriam has a degree from the University of Chicago and over 20 years of experience in high tech sales and marketing for new technologies.
Email Miriam
TWITTER:@spaldingbarker

READ LATER - DOWNLOAD THIS POST AS PDF >> CLICK HERE <<

$1,000 is Up for Grabs Every Week – AirVuz Drone Video of the Week Contest! was originally posted at https://dronelife.com/2018/04/08/1000-grabs-every-week-airvuz-drone-video-week-contest/ by Miriam McNabb

Continue Reading

aerial cinematography

The Alliance for Drone Innovation

Published

on

This post was originally published on this site
Manufacturing giant DJI has announced the launch of the Alliance for Drone Innovation (ADI), an effort to broaden the support for the goals of the former Drone Manufacturers Alliance originally formed 2 years ago by 3DR, GoPro, DJI and Parrot.

The new organization will address the same issues – but the coalition has now expanded to include suppliers and software developers of both personal and professional drones “as well as the innovative Americans who fly them for recreational, artistic, and business purposes,” says the Alliance.

Led by Jenny Rosenberg, former Department of Transportation Acting Assistant Secretary for Aviation and International Affairs, the group’s focus is on legislative and regulatory activity: matters of critical importance right now to stakeholders in the recreational drone industry.  Recent arguments over the repeal of Section 336 in the next FAA Authorization package – a move which would grant the FAA broad authority to impose laws for recreational drones – could threaten the growth of the sector.  Recreational drone manufacturers and advocacy groups are committed to keeping the law in place, which would mean that recreational droners do not have to get a Part 107 license or additional training to fly as long as they fly within the framework of a community-based flight organization, such as the Academy of Model Aeronautics (AMA) or the Drone User Group (DUG.)

“ADI is focused on promoting innovation and the growth of the unmanned aircraft industry for both personal and professional use,” says ADI.  “…ADI promotes awareness among policymakers, media and the general public of how drones help society, ensuring that government policies allow everyone to achieve the benefits of safe and responsible drone flight.”

“We look forward to working with Congress, the administration, and other stakeholders on policies that promote innovation and allow the drone market to flourish in a responsible and safe manner,” said ADI Executive Director Jenny Rosenberg.

In addition to legal protections for recreational operators as mentioned above, the ADI supports a micro-drone classification exempting very small and lightweight aircraft from certain laws, and the preservation of FAA preemption.  FAA preemption refers to the idea that the FAA should maintain ultimate authority over the airspace, preventing state, tribal and local governments from passing their own drone laws.

Miriam McNabb is the Editor-in-Chief of DRONELIFE and CEO of JobForDrones, a professional drone services marketplace, and a fascinated observer of the emerging drone industry and the regulatory environment for drones. Miriam has a degree from the University of Chicago and over 20 years of experience in high tech sales and marketing for new technologies.
Email Miriam
TWITTER:@spaldingbarker

READ LATER - DOWNLOAD THIS POST AS PDF >> CLICK HERE <<

The Alliance for Drone Innovation was originally posted at https://dronelife.com/2018/04/07/alliance-drone-innovation/ by Miriam McNabb

Continue Reading

aerial cinematography

Firefly Drone Shows: The Team Behind That Viral Video Expands Their Fleet

Published

on

By

This post was originally published on this site

Press Release: Firefly Drone Shows, founded by Kyle Dorosz and Ryan Sigmon, is expanding their fleet to 200 custom-built drones and booking for a variety of outdoor events this summer. They are the third company in the United States to gain approval for performing across the country, and one of the few in the world to also possess a night waiver from the FAA for drone shows. Routines are pre-programmed, choreographed, and automated by a computer to create any design imaginable in the sky. This level of customization makes light shows an ideal alternative to traditional fireworks for corporate, private, and special events.

Firefly recently made headlines in regional news outlets, including MLive and ABC 12, after a video of their first test performance, recorded by Grand Blanc resident Kaylin Adams, went viral. Dorosz was operating 30 drones at dusk, from Holly Cloud Hoppers flying field, which piqued the curiosity of Adams plus 10-15 other drivers who parked on the shoulder of the I-75 highway to safely view the synchronized light show.

Traditional fireworks are loud, costly, can be used only once, and emit various harmful toxins. Drone shows don’t leave a carbon footprint and can be executed repeatedly, something co-founder Dorosz believes will appeal to to eco-conscious industries including music and entertainment. “We are able to create bright, impactful displays in the sky without the significant pollution or steep costs generally associated with fireworks.”

A light show can last up to 20 minutes. However, additional drones can be launched to replace drones with depleted batteries, creating a seamless and continuous light show. Anyone attending a music festival, county fair, or corporate event this summer will be relieved to know that if they spot groups of lights performing mesmerizing routines, it’s likely a Firefly Drone Show at work and not a visit from extraterrestrial beings.

Firefly is currently booking summer events across the nation. View more of their shows, and follow along, on Instagram, YouTube, Facebook, or visit fireflydroneshows.com.

About Firefly Drone Shows

Firefly provides synchronized drone light shows for corporate and private events, as well as custom applications. One of the only FAA-approved companies in the world, Firefly offers the latest technology operated by the most experienced pilots.

READ LATER - DOWNLOAD THIS POST AS PDF >> CLICK HERE <<

Firefly Drone Shows: The Team Behind That Viral Video Expands Their Fleet was originally posted at https://dronelife.com/2018/04/07/firefly-drone-shows-team-behind-viral-video-expands-fleet/ by

Continue Reading
Free Email Updates
Get the latest content first.
We respect your privacy.

Tags

Trending

Free Email Updates
Get the latest content first.
We respect your privacy.